Author ORCID Identifier

https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0331-9960

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

4-28-2011

DOI

10.1371/journal.pone.0019344

Publication Title

PLOS ONE

Volume

6

Issue

4

College/School

Case School of Engineering

Department/Center

Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

Grant

R21 (AI087107)

Funder

Center for Integration of Medicine and Innovative Technology (CIMIT), U.S. Army Medical Research Acquisition Activity Cooperative Agreement; Coulter Foundation Early Career Award; U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (USAMRMC); Telemedicine and Advanced Technology Research Center (TATRC)

Abstract

Decellularization and cellularization of organs have emerged as disruptive methods in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Porous hydrogel scaffolds have widespread applications in tissue engineering, regenerative medicine and drug discovery as viable tissue mimics. However, the existing hydrogel fabrication techniques suffer from limited control over pore interconnectivity, density and size, which leads to inefficient nutrient and oxygen transport to cells embedded in the scaffolds. Here, we demonstrated an innovative approach to develop a new platform for tissue engineered constructs using live bacteria as sacrificial porogens. E.coli were patterned and cultured in an interconnected three-dimensional (3D) hydrogel network. The growing bacteria created interconnected micropores and microchannels. Then, the scafold was decellularized, and bacteria were eliminated from the scaffold through lysing and washing steps. This 3D porous network method combined with bioprinting has the potential to be broadly applicable and compatible with tissue specific applications allowing seeding of stem cells and other cell types.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

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