Author ORCID Identifier

https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0331-9960

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

3-6-2015

DOI

10.1038/srep08719

Publication Title

Scientific Reports

Volume

5

College/School

Case School of Engineering

Department/Center

Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

Grant

NIH R01AI093282; NIH R01GM086382; NIH U54EB15408; NIH R21AI087107; F32AI102590; 2214A

Funder

National Institutes of Health (NIH); Brigham and Women’s Hospital BRI Translatable Technologies and Care Innovation Grant; The Scientific and Technical Research Council of Turkey (TUBITAK)

Abstract

The need for sensitive, robust, portable and inexpensive biosensing platforms is of significant interest in clinical applications for disease diagnosis and treatment monitoring at the point-of-care (POC) settings. Rapid, accurate POC diagnostic assays play a crucial role in developing countries, where there are limited laboratory infrastructure, trained personnel and financial support. However, current diagnostic assays commonly require long assay time, sophisticated infrastructure and expensive reagents that are not compatible with resource-constrained settings. Although paper and flexible material-based platform technologies provide alternative approaches to develop POC diagnostic assays for broad applications in medicine, they have technical challenges integrating to different detection modalities. Here, we address the limited capability of current paper and flexible material-based platforms by integrating cellulose paper and flexible polyester films as diagnostic biosensing materials with various detection modalities through the development and validation of new widely applicable electrical and optical sensing mechanisms using antibodies and peptides. By incorporating these different detection modalities, we present selective and accurate capture and detection of multiple biotargets including viruses (Human Immunodeficieny Virus-1), bacteria (Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus) and cells (CD4+ T lymphocytes) from fingerprick volume equivalent of multiple biological specimens such as whole blood, plasma and peritoneal dialysis effluent with clinically relevant detection and sensitivity.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

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