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Abstract

This research account reports conclusions from a small group of interviews done with Korean-American entrepreneurs located in three ethnic enclaves near Atlanta, GA. The purpose of this research is to further knowledge in immigrant entrepreneurship. Methodology comprised seven one-hour interviews conducted with first generation business owners (one male and six female) in three enclaves in Atlanta. The research used qualitative design and focused on answering three important questions: How do Korean entrepreneurs discover and exploit opportunities to develop business, how does this sample describe their experiences in the studied enclaves, and how might espoused cultural traits and business skills affect entrepreneurial success. It was found that these ethnic entrepreneurs started and operated their businesses in ways similar to what has been reported in prior research and similar to native-born American entrepreneurs. However, some important differences emerged. Korean electronic social media was employed in ways not previously reported. Churches provided support that may have been greater than secular enclave associations. Finally, the enclaves themselves evolved in ways different than has been reported about Korean enclaves in current literature. These findings engender the implication that the entrepreneurial experience for this population is self-contained. These topics deserve additional research.

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