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Abstract

Although the prevalence of Executive Doctoral Programs (EDPs) is increasing, little is known about their influence on management practice. To support further research and debate into this important area, this essay presents a dynamic model of EDP impact and discusses how the model can help reorient current knowledge on practitioner–scholar behaviors and careers. The model identifies six dimensions of EDPs’ personal impact: 1) cognitive development, 2) academic contribution, 3) practical impact, 4) career mobility, 5) identity transformation, and 6) community belonging. In addition, it identifies eight activities that represent EDPs’ practical impact: 1) direct management application, 2) teaching or educational engagement, 3) consulting or coaching, 4) knowledge productization, 5) engagement in communities of practice, 6) creating communities of practice, 7) public speaking, and 8) influencing policy. The model is developed based on evidence from a grounded theory analysis of survey data from the EDP at Weatherhead School of Management. In conclusion, we discuss how the various stakeholders in EDPs can leverage and further develop the model and its various elements to increase the influence of practitioner–scholars on management practice.

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